Design Technology

Design Technology

Aims of the subject

We provide a high-quality design and technology education that should give students opportunities to create, innovate, design, make and evaluate a variety of well-crafted products that are fit for purpose. Students will be taught the technical skills and craftsmanship to execute practical tasks, thereby developing confidence to increase their skills, knowledge and competence in using materials, machinery, techniques and processes. Students should develop valuable practical skills and use these safely with a range of resistant and non-resistant materials, drawing media tools and equipment, in both 2D and 3D. They will be shown how to communicate their ideas and designs skillfully and accurately in 2D and 3D, using a variety of techniques, including digital technology. They will develop an understanding of good design, everyday products and use correct technical terminology with Design & Technology literacy. They will be allowed to investigate and analyse the rich history of design and technological innovation and the work of others, including iconic designs, to inform their own work. They will be shown developments in design and technology and the responsibilities of designers, including environmental responsibilities. Students will investigate how robotics are used in industry and be given the chance to programme their own robot. Students should clearly enjoy the subject, whilst developing a mastery of the specialist area. They will be guided by a teacher who themselves demonstrates a passion for Design & Technology.

Styles of Teaching

Staff will adopt appropriate teaching and learning styles. These may include:

Group work / discussion and feedback

Class discussion and questioning

Individual pupil tasks

Information technology (including – ICT where appropriate)

Worksheets

Written and practical tasks

Utilisation of the problem solving process, and differentiation

Progression routes

The subject allows for a number of progression routes:

Design and Technology: enables students to develop both a broad understanding of design and manufacturing principles and an insight into the infrastructure which underpins design and manufacturing enterprises, such as finance, marketing and environmental issues.  In addition, the qualification covers a mixture of units from the theoretical through to those with a clear practical emphasis.  As such it will provide a firm basis for progression to either employment or higher education. Higher education: The units provide a sound basis for progression to a range of higher education courses, e.g. Product Design, Graphic Design, Industrial 3D Design, CAD/CAM, Engineering, Architecture, Interior Design, Manufacturing, but also courses linked to the Environment, Business, Advertising, Creative Arts, Multi Media Technology and Marketing.

Employment:  Examples of career opportunities are in Product Design, Graphic Design, Marketing, Technical Sales, Buying, Interior/Exhibition Design, Quality Control, Production Planning, Finance and Costing of the Manufacturing Process, use of CAD in Manufacturing etc.

Year 7

Unit 1 – Key Skills
Sketching Skills & techniques, Research Skills, Designing, Developing, Modelling

Focus areas: Research and Developing ideas
Sketching & Presentation skills, Initial Design Ideas, Researching a design style Development, Final Design

Unit 2 – Night light
Sketching Skills & techniques, Designing, Developing, Evaluating Products, Modelling / Testing, Subtractive
Manufacture (Sawing, Filing, Drilling) Vacuum Forming, Electronics.

Focus areas: Making and Evaluating
Manufacture and evaluate an electronic circuit, vacuum form a casing.
Formative & Summative assessment

Unit 3 – A Balanced Diet
Eat well plate, How different foods work in the body. Healthy choices. Understanding their own diet and how to improve.
Portion sizes, composite foods, roux sauce, rubbing in method, meat handling

Focus areas: Making and Evaluation
Plan and make an individual pizza that will be assessed.
Evaluate their pizza design and making to recognise improvements.
Formative and summative

Unit 4 – Flower Holder
Theoretical understanding of how plastics are classified and why we use them.  Designing, Developing, CAD, Subtractive manufacture (Sawing, filing, drilling, sanding), Finishing.

Focus areas: Generating ideas and Developing ideas
Generating initial ideas, Development of ideas,
Manufacture a quality finished product.
Formative & Summative assessment

Year 8

Unit 1: Mood Lamp
Designing for User Groups, User group & Client interviews, Product Analysis,
Electronic circuits, sketching techniques, presentation techniques, Sawing & cutting skills, shaping techniques, Soldering
Sawing & cutting skills, shaping techniques, CAD, 3D Printing.
Manufacturing skills

Focus areas: Developing ideas and Evaluation
Analyse existing products, Create an Inspiration board, Soldering, Sketching,
Design Ideas, Develop ideas, CAD, 3D
Printing, Planning for manufacture, manufacture using a range of hand skills
Alongside 3D Printing, Evaluation

Unit 2: De Stijl Clock
Design styles
Designing, Developing, modelling, CAD, Subtractive manufacture (Sawing, filing,drilling), Finishing, Evaluation

Focus areas: Generating ideas and developing ideas
Initial ideas, Development, CAD of final design, manufacture of final idea.
Summative assessment, Testing and Evaluations,
Manufacture & Quality of Finish

Unit 3: Bridges and Systems
Structures, forces, modeling

Focus areas: Research and Make
Analysis of existing bridges, theoretical theory behind bridge construction. Designing and making their bridge to scale, testing to destruction.

Unit 4: Food and Nutrition
The different nutritional groups how the different nutrients work together and in the body.
Understanding food production and the environment.
Pastry making, meat and fish handling. Vegetarian dishes and a combination of traditional savoury and sweet dishes.

Focus areas: Research and Make
Researching the different types of nutrients. Production types, environmental issues. Writing a design specification and making product.
Formative and summative

Year 9

Unit 1: Wooden Container
Theoretical underpinning of Woods, Design of a Traditional wooden container
Sketching (2D / 3D – boxes / isometric drawing), communication & presentation skills, research, hardwoods, CAD, industrial manufacture, cutting / sawing wood joints, sanding, finishing, detailing
Testing & Evaluation

Focus areas: Generating ideas, Developing ideas and Make
Design Ideas, Development, Final Design, Wood
Joints, Sawing, Cutting, Joining, Detailing,
Finishing, Assembling, testing & evaluation
Research, Sketching & Presentation skills, Initial
Design Ideas, Development, Final Design Solution

Unit 2: Staple Foods
Detailed understanding of nutrition and chemistry of food.
Provenance of food and key presentation skills.
Cooking International cuisine, high level preparation skills and healthy menus.

Focus areas: Research, Make and Evaluate
Nutritional evaluation, understanding and tracing provenance of different food.
Project including detailed research, production of a dish and evaluation of project.

Unit 3: Mobile Phone Holder
Theoretical underpinning of Plastics, Design of a mobile phone holder/stand
Sketching (2D / 3D – isometric drawing, card modelling), communication & presentation skills, research, thermoplastics and thermosetting plastics, CAD, cutting / sawing plastics, joining plastics, sanding, finishing, detailing.
Testing & Evaluation

Focus areas: Generating ideas, Developing ideas and Make
Analysis of existing products, Sketching & Presentation skills, Initial Design Ideas, Development, Final Design, CAD skills, Assembly,
Testing and Evaluation, Manufacture & Quality of Finish – Formative & Summative assessment,
Research, Design Ideas, 3D Sketching,
Development, Final Design Solution.

Unit 4: Creative Candle Holder
Theoretical underpinning of wood and sustainability, Design of a Tea Light candle holder.
Sketching (2D / 3D – isometric drawing) card modelling of 3d patterns with light, communication & presentation skills, research, hardwood and softwoods, cutting / sawing woods, wood joints, sanding, finishing, detailing, Testing & Evaluation.

Focus areas: Generating ideas, Developing ideas and Make
Analysis of existing lighting solutions, Sketching & Presentation skills, Initial Design Ideas based on individual research, Development completed through modelling, Final Design on CAD
Manufacture & Quality of Finish – Formative & Summative assessment.

Key Stage 4

At Key Stage 4 we offer AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition, Graphic Products, Resistant Materials and Product Design. The students undertake a series of projects which extend their knowledge and understanding whilst at the same time develop their practical skills further. The GCSE courses involve a substantial amount of coursework, a controlled assessment, and students complete this during the second year of study. At KS4 the take up of the subject is good with large numbers opting for both Food Preparation and Nutrition   & Resistant Materials. Students are successful in all areas of Design & Technology and it is often their best overall result.

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition
Exam board: AQA

What is assessed:

Paper 1: Food preparation and nutrition (Exam)
Students will be tested on their Theoretical knowledge of food preparation and nutrition in the areas of food nutrition and health, food science, food safety, food choice and food provenance
How it is assessed:
• Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
• 100 marks
• 50% of GCSE
Questions
• Multiple choice questions (20 marks)
• Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)
Non-exam assessment (NEA)
What is assessed:
Task 1: Food investigation
Students’ will be tested on their understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients through practical investigations.
Task 2: Food preparation assessment
Students’ knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.
Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.
How it is assessed:
• Task 1: Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.
• Task 2: Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

Upon completion of this course, students will be qualified to go on to further study, or embark on an apprenticeship or full time career in the catering or food industries.

Year 10

Students focus on a number of small design and make activities / projects. Each project will focus on a number of key skills / techniques to allow students to work with different ingredients and methods of cooking, leading to a strong base of chefing level skills. They will also focus on detailed nutrition and chemistry of food, how the chemistry affects function and outcome  This year focuses on developing student’s skills and knowledge of the subject area. Lessons are divided into practical and theory based sessions, with homework being set on a regular basis.

GCSE Graphic Products
Exam board: AQA

GCSE Design and Technology: Graphic Products covers a wide range of products including packaging, point-of-sale display, architecture, interior and garden design and 3D product (concept) design. Apart from learning a variety of practical designing and making skills, pupils will also develop their knowledge and understanding of industrial and commercial practices.

Students will be enthused and challenged by the range of practical activities possible. They will be encouraged to learn to use, understand and apply colour and design through images, to develop spatial concepts, and to understand graphic materials and their manipulation. They will design and make product(s) using graphic media and new technologies to prepare them for the world of work.

Year 11

A single design-and-make activity selected from a choice of set tasks, consisting of the development of a made outcome and a concise design folder. These tasks are reviewed every two years. The design folder should consist of approximately 20 pages of A3 paper.

It is expected that students should spend approximately 45 hours on this activity. As part of the evidence submitted, students should include photographs of the finished products as well as photographs at various stages of the process.

Exam Board: AQA

Coursework folder: Controlled Assessment

  • 90 marks
  • 60% of the total marks

Exam: Written Paper

  • 2 hours
  • 120 marks
  • 40% of the total marks

One paper with two sections:

Section A: A design question based on context sup-plied before the exam (30 marks)

Section B: Covers all aspects of the specification content (90 marks)

GCSE Resistant Materials
Exam board: AQA

GCSE Design and Technology: Resistant Material covers a wide range of activities based on designing and making products that are manufactured using materials such as wood, metal and plastics in many forms. As well as learning hand skills, pupils use a range of industrial processes to shape and form materials into functioning products.

This specification requires students to develop their knowledge of woods, metals, plastics and composite materials. Other materials may also be used and the use of new technologies is also encouraged.

Year 10

Students focus on a number of small design and make activities / projects. Each project will focus on a number of skills / techniques and allow students to work with different materials including woods, metals, plastics, composite materials and SMART materials. This year focuses on developing student’s skills and knowledge of the subject area. Lessons are divided into folder work, practical and theory based sessions, with homework being set on a regular basis.

Year 11

A single design-and-make activity selected from a choice of set tasks, consisting of the development of a made outcome and a concise design folder. These tasks are reviewed every two years. The design folder should consist of approximately 20 pages of A3 paper.

Term 1 – Major Project Coursework
Research of the theme, Development of Design Ideas, Modelling & Testing, Final Design Solution, CAD, CAM, Planning for Manufacture, Costing

Term 2
Component manufacture, Realisation, Finishing, Assembling, Evaluation & testing

Term 3
Examination preparation (based on theme provided by examination board). Practise papers, tests, exam practise.

  • Subject content in terms of topics covered
  • Skills taught
  • Methods and timings of assessment

It is expected that students should spend approximately 45 hours on this activity. As part of the evidence submitted, students should include photographs of the finished products as well as photographs at various stages of the process.

Examination board and syllabus details
Exam Board: AQA

Coursework folder: Controlled Assessment

  • 90 marks
  • 60% of the total marks

Exam: Written Paper

  • 2 hours
  • 120 marks
  • 40% of the total marks

One paper with two sections:

Section A: A design question based on context sup-plied before the exam (30 marks)

Section B: Covers all aspects of the specification content (90 marks)

All courses have a clear and simple structure to help students revise for and relate the work done for Controlled Assessment to the exam. There is a practical approach that encourages students to design and make products with creativity and originality in a variety of practical activities, using a range of materials and techniques. The use of ICT will form a key element of all the courses with computer aided design being used in the development and realisation of their ideas.

Key Stage 5

GCSE Product Design
Exam board: AQA

Students who wish to extend their interest in design or even seek a career related to design can study A Level Product Design at Key Stage 5. This is a broad based subject which extends students skills further from Key Stage 4 and can lead them into a variety of different careers including architecture, design & engineering. As part of the course a trips are organised to local company’s which furthers students’ awareness and understanding of the subject by seeing at  first-hand the processes that they are learning about in the classroom.

At A Level the department teaches AQA AS and A2 Product Design, which allows the pupils to follow a course which can be individually tailored to their future career or academic aspirations.

AS students undertake 2 modules:
Unit 1 – Materials, Components and Application
50% of AS, 25% of A Level

2 hour written paper

At AS level candidates should develop an understanding of the physical and mechanical properties of a broad range of materials and components. They should understand why these are used in specific applications with particular emphasis on the life-cycle of products including manufacture, use and disposal. Candidates should have a good understanding of the methods by which materials and components can be manipulated to manufacture products. Through study and first-hand experience in practical project work, candidates will also develop knowledge of the health and safety issues relevant to working with materials. Coursework projects may also provide an opportunity for students to learn about the use of computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacture (CAM), and the use of basic quality control measures.

In addition to this, through study and detailed analysis of a wide range of products, candidates should begin to develop knowledge and understanding of the broader issues for the designer such as: environmental sustainability of products and their manufacture, ergonomic and anthropometrics, inclusive design, and consumer safety.

Unit 2 – Learning Through Designing and Making
50% of AS, 25% of A Level

Coursework – approx. 50 hours, 80 marks

Written design portfolio and manufactured outcome(s).

Coursework may take a number of forms: a simple design-and-make project, two smaller projects or a portfolio of work.

A2 students also undertake 2 modules:

A2 Units
Unit 3 – Design and Manufacture
25% of A Level

2 hour written paper

There is an expectation that candidates will have a knowledge and understanding of Materials and Components, gained as a result of studying the subject content at AS level and having developed this through their coursework at Unit 2. At A2 this knowledge and understanding will be developed through Unit 4 coursework and a further study of how materials and components play a major part in:

• Design and Market Influences – e.g. the evolution, selection and application of materials for the manufacture of modern products. How the use and conservation of both energy and raw materials affect the selection and application of materials for the production and function of products today.

• Processes and Manufacture e.g. the application of materials and components to suit specific production processes, from one-off to mass-production.

Unit 4 – Design and Making Practice
25% of A Level

Coursework – approx. 60 hours, 85 marks

Coursework units 2 and 4 are substantial design and make projects where knowledge of the AS and A2 subject content is applied to a client based project of the students’ choice. It will seek to develop existing and new skills by the use of a range of materials and manufacturing processes. The design work involves detailed primary and secondary research leading to a product specification which then allows the student to propose a range of ideas that culminate in a chosen design. Detailed development then follows which includes the use of 3D CAD software and planning the sequence of manufacture leading the making of a high quality outcome. A thorough evaluation of the complete product is then made including the views of the client and others. Throughout the units a range of presentational techniques are employed to produce the accompanying design folder. In Unit 4 students are encouraged, where possible, to choose a project that compliments their chosen career area. They can for example be engineering based or lay more emphasis on product design or creative 3D design.

For further information please contact the Head of Department:
Gary Ball
gball@ilfracombeacademy.org.uk

Useful Links and Supporting Documents

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/design-and-technology#bm-GCSE

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/food-preparation-and-nutrition/gcse/food-preparation-and-nutrition-8585

http://www.technologystudent.com/

Extra-curricular opportunities:

Use of workshops with teacher supervision

 

Content updated January 2017